Archoil Anyone have experience with this additive?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Jack Snodgrass, Oct 11, 2017.


  1. Jack Snodgrass

    Jack Snodgrass Member

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    My 98 is at 230K miles and I want to keep right on running her. I'm considering this additive with my oil to reduce friction and improve performance. Has anyone else tried the product?? Thanks
     
  2. JExpedition07

    JExpedition07 Elite Member

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    I'd say don't add anything. If it's running good just keep using the oil your using and she should keep going. Too many times people have high mileage engines that run perfect and then they go throw some "magic juice" in it and the motor knocks away and wears prematurely.
     
    ExpeditionAndy and Big Brian like this.
  3. ExpeditionAndy

    ExpeditionAndy Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    +1 on what JExpedition07 said.
     
  4. poorboy1964

    poorboy1964 Full Access Members

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    I'll go against the crowd here on this one. In the diesel world this is know as one of the best. oil analysis through blackstone has show an improvement with this and revex but the archoil is about half the cost I run it in both my ford diesels
    That being said I don't run it in the ex because i'm to cheep to pay for it.
     
  5. USMCBuckWild

    USMCBuckWild Full Access Members

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    There is a Mechanical Engineer who did a “extreme pressure wear test” of 212 different off-the-shelf oils and some oils+additives. He wrote a very, Very, VERY detailed blog on it and posted all of his findings by rankings. Now his basis for the testing is designed more around the old flat tappet cam push rod American V8, which does and does not coincide with more modern engines. His testing method is quite extreme but does not (as he admits) specifically duplicate the pressures associated inside of an internal combustion engine. He attempts to duplicate the oil film coating associated with the traditional mechanical flat tappet cam against cam lobes for his tests. His test method specifically targets an oil’s resistance to wear at operating temperature through the oil’s break-down temperature in a 30 second test, then measuring the “scarring” or spalling of the test materials. Does this apply specifically to our engines (specifically the 5.4/4.6 family)? Yes and no. Yes we do have oil film contact surfaces in our engines. But, we do not have the extreme point to point contact associated with the flat tappet cam. Take that for what you will. He also touches on Used Oil Analysis, but in his opinion a UOA is “closing the barn door after the horse is out” and a waste of money (of which I STRONGLY disagree). The UOA provides an excellent look at the internal health of an engine. To me the UOA is not about the actual oil but more about the engine components and their current status, which coupled with a history of UOAs can help alleviate premature wear and failure and even help predict possible future issues.

    The blog is several hundred pages and I am still reviewing it but the synopsis is that HIGH Zinc/Phosphate oils are not as ‘wear resistant’ as advertised. His science is true; physics don’t lie. He also proves (through scientific method and aerospace testing methodology) that a majority of oil additives actual REDUCE the effectiveness of oil under pressures at operating temperature (212-278* F with oil preheated to 250* for testing).

    He is correct on the main point: too much zinc/phosphate IS actually bad for an engine. Zinc and phosphate actually attack the metals of the engine, specifically iron. But this point has been known for years, especially to the “newer generation” of engine builders. The older generation tend to stick to the “we’ve always done it this way” methodology, hence the “tried and true” ultra high-zinc break-in oils and products marketed ad-nauseam.

    What is not addressed is the differences of the oil applications (ie: different engine types) as his basis for his testing is specifically for the Big Block Chevy V8. Aluminum engines and components respond differently than iron. Roller cam, roller rockers, hydraulic buffering lifters/buckets, bee hive/dual valve springs, hydraulic adjustable pushrods all were developed to reduce this specific friction point. The entire study needs to be looked at with an open mind and an educational/observational point of view.

    Now, I personally have not looked into the Archoil product, and I don’t believe ANY hype and/or so-called testimonials. As far as I am concerned advertising and testimonials fall into the” Its all bullshit and its all bad for you “ category.

    I will link the blog shortly as its on the laptop and not my phone (which gets 99% of my r&d duty).
     
  6. 08T1

    08T1 Full Access Members

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    If some one is having to add an additive to their oil.... then maybe their oil is not what their engine is requiring.

    Maybe a different brand or type of oil is needed.
     
  7. rjdelp7

    rjdelp7 Full Access Members

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    Use 5W30. The 5W20, spec was for US cars, to meet C.A.F.E (fuel mileage)standards. It is maybe, .010% of a mpg savings. The same motor outside US, has 5W30 recommended. Castrol and Pennzoil, make a European formula. It has extra wear additives, recommended by German manufactures. The catch is, these additives can harm catalytic converters, if engine burns any oil. Mobil 1 make a ESP(emission system protection) line, specifically without these additives. I guess the Germans, rather replace a converter, than a engine. There is a product called Engine Restore. It is supposed to fill in micro scratches in cylinder walls, and restore compression. An other popular product is Hy-per Lube. It is extreme pressure lubricant. It increases film strength, seals rings better, viscosity improver and thermo(anti foam) reducer,
     
  8. poorboy1964

    poorboy1964 Full Access Members

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