20 year tune up questions.

budlavek

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Hi All,
I am a new member but a LONG time expy owner.

I have a 2003 4x4 eddie bower with about 150k miles since new.
Its been a GREAT car and is completely stock except the radio which would eat CD's.

I want to give it some love.

At first.

Im thinking about getting drilled/slotted rotors with new calipers and metal lines.

I want MORE stopping power - I've always hated how it stops even when NOT towing anything the pedal "feel" is very bad it goes way down and the suv takes long to stop.

Which setup would you all recommend ?

I do tow a 6k boat sometimes which has surge brakes so no need for electric controller.

Also - I have a budget for the brakes of about $2500.00 for front and rear

I would like to spend less if possible because after the brakes, I would like to change the shocks / struts. (whats recommended?)

Then get the tranny serviced.



Thank you,
-A
 

Trainmaster

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Save the $2500 to put toward a newer truck when this one finally gives up the ghost. It's not "if," but "when".

I don't think drilled/slotted rotors will do much but make some Chinese company a few bucks. If you want aggressive breaking, get a set of metallic pads and be done with it.

Hate to sound discouraging, but This thing's pushing 20 years old and that's borrowed time...
 

Hamfisted

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Are you the original owner ? What brake pads are on there now ? There are pads out there that provide a little improvement over the stock pads. Rotors are a personal preference, use what you want. The Akebono ASP934A is a great performance ceramic pad, and low dust for the fronts. The Akebono ACT935 are good for the rear. Are your brake lines damaged or corroded, that you want to replace them at 150k miles ?
 
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budlavek

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Thanks for the reply - Yes - I am the original owner. The current pad were some nice aftermarket ones specific to towing.
At that time I replace the rotors with OEM ones.
The lines are good - But im expecting / hoping to get less "mushy'ness" out of the pedal

Wheels are 22" "tires are 305/40/22 i think"

The shocks are original so I will be doing them also
 
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budlavek

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Save the $2500 to put toward a newer truck when this one finally gives up the ghost. It's not "if," but "when".

I don't think drilled/slotted rotors will do much but make some Chinese company a few bucks. If you want aggressive breaking, get a set of metallic pads and be done with it.

Hate to sound discouraging, but This thing's pushing 20 years old and that's borrowed time...


I hear what you are saying ... my wife said the same thing. And the AC does not work and needs repair..... :(
 

Trainmaster

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I would see if the AC could be repaired with a quick fix, put a new pair of rotors and metallic pads on it and keep the old girl running. They don't last forever.
 

joethefordguy

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i would go with the heaviest premium solid rotors available. for heavy duty use, such as towing, you want something that will hold a lot of heat. drilling, etc., help it shed heat quicker than otherwise, but diminish the heat holding capacity. you're not going racing, so you can do without that - you want to be able to stop a heavy load, hence you're going to have to handle a lot of heat.
 

BlackCoffee

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The pedal going all the way to the floor doesn't right. I have an 2003 EB with 270K miles. I have done several brake jobs and each time the pedal travel is good. I have tried several aftermarket pads, calipers, and rotors. Other than the pads themselves, good stock rotors and calipers work pretty well. I used Autozone, slotted rotors last time and they are pretty good. Good pads from EBC or Powerstop should be good. I did have on rotor that warped overtime, it was the Powerstop. If the pedal is going to the floor, I would checkout your Brake Booster. Easy to change, and that may be the problem. I agree with Hamfisted, ceramic pads seem to work the best and do not produce the noise of metallic pads.

Unless something drastic has happened, I would think your transmission just needs a fluid change. Much else would use up a big hunk of your budget. My transmission lost overdrive at 250K and required a rebuild. So, you could have 100K left.

I replaced my radio with a Crutchfield setup and put in a backup camera. Helps with the trailer. That would run about $350-$400.

Not sure you need to worry about struts, do the bounce test. Does it nose dive in a stop? I am doing my front struts now, and it is not that hard or expensive. In fact, the only reason I am doing it is because I need to replace the upper ball joints and control arms. Which is really something you should inspect. If you want to tow, make sure your steering is in good shape.

Hope this helps.
 
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