5w40 vs 5w30 for 3.5 HO?

texman0016

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There are some people that swear by 5w40 for the 3.5 HO's ("Raptor" engine). We have a 2022 Timberline I don't care about fuel mileage. Goal is to put the oil weight that will protect the engine better. I run Lubrication Engineers or Amsoil with a OE filter. Thanks in advance.
 

LazSlate

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I always go down this road with all my cars. Rule of thumb is use what is recommended is always the safest. But with that said its also where you live. The "W" stands for Winter and the number before is the thinnest it will be in the cold temps. The number after is how thick it will be at normal temps. So in reality the lower number is the most important since lack of lubrication at cold temps is disastrous. If you are constantly off roading and maxing out the engine temps then 5w40 could be better. IMO 5W30 is the best and if you are in really cold then 0W30. I live in AZ and run 5W/30 in my Timberline. I have a Ford Van and run 5W20 in that since its the Triton and it likes the thinner oils per Ford. Always best to run what the Engineer's who designed the engine recommend.
 

Rednecked

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Check out https://www.triaxlubricants.com/

I run this oil in my 7.3 Powerstroke. Night and day difference. I started running it in my expedition. Their oil is specifically formulated for ecoboost engines.
 

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texman0016

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I always go down this road with all my cars. Rule of thumb is use what is recommended is always the safest. But with that said its also where you live. The "W" stands for Winter and the number before is the thinnest it will be in the cold temps. The number after is how thick it will be at normal temps. So in reality the lower number is the most important since lack of lubrication at cold temps is disastrous. If you are constantly off roading and maxing out the engine temps then 5w40 could be better. IMO 5W30 is the best and if you are in really cold then 0W30. I live in AZ and run 5W/30 in my Timberline. I have a Ford Van and run 5W20 in that since its the Triton and it likes the thinner oils per Ford. Always best to run what the Engineer's who designed the engine recommend.
Thanks for the elaborate response! I live in Texas, and it's the wife's truck, so I was wondering if I could get a "win win" by using the same oil as I use in my 6.7 powerstroke. You're probably right about just sticking to the recommended by the engineers. I'm the guy that always wants "extra" (full dual filter intake system, upgraded crank case ventilation with oil catch can, etc.). I'll try to be a grown up this time around and just use recommended, throw in a K&N filter, and vynl wrap the chrome and silver for kicks. Maybe I just needed someone to talk me out of it, so thank you sir
 

LokiWolf

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I am going to go a bit further and add to @LazSlate's post a bit.

Always best to run what the Engineer's who designed the engine recommend.

I in theory understand and can partially get behind this statement. But not in reality. The only person who would stand behind this statement is an actual engineer. Anybody who actually works on things, whether that is cars, mechanical equipment, or electronics would disagree. Let's take it a bit further.

Always best to run what the Engineer's who designed the engine recommend.

or BETTER. That would be how I would state that. What the manual and manufacturer recommends is the MINIMUM to meet the protection needs of the motor.

Now I would not use an oil specifically formulated for diesels, in my Ecoboosts, but some of those ALSO meet and exceed the specs for our motors. Do your homework.

Rule of thumb as far as conventional vs Synthetic. If it came with conventional, blended and full syn's are an upgrade, and will do great. If it came with blended, DO NOT run conventional, but Full Syn would also do great.

Ford generally uses blends in their motors, for 2 reasons, cheaper than Synthetic, and better protection than conventional under high heat and high pressure.

Currently mine are under maintenance from my dealer, so they get the recommended oil about every 5K. If I was doing in myself, they would be running Valvoline Full Syn.

Now as far as the weight. If you are in Texas, the 5W30 is fine. If you were tuning it, towing a bunch, running it hard in high heat situations, 5W40 would probably be a good thing. 0WXX would not benefit you.
 

BSarchet

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Have you seen any analysis of it? I can look, but was curious if you had come across any?
I read through some forums and watched this analysis review. It wasn’t an overly detailed research by me admittedly. I liked the idea of an oil designed for the eco boost but I would love to hear your thoughts if you look into it.

 

LazSlate

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I am going to go a bit further and add to @LazSlate's post a bit.



I in theory understand and can partially get behind this statement. But not in reality. The only person who would stand behind this statement is an actual engineer. Anybody who actually works on things, whether that is cars, mechanical equipment, or electronics would disagree. Let's take it a bit further.



or BETTER. That would be how I would state that. What the manual and manufacturer recommends is the MINIMUM to meet the protection needs of the motor.

Now I would not use an oil specifically formulated for diesels, in my Ecoboosts, but some of those ALSO meet and exceed the specs for our motors. Do your homework.

Rule of thumb as far as conventional vs Synthetic. If it came with conventional, blended and full syn's are an upgrade, and will do great. If it came with blended, DO NOT run conventional, but Full Syn would also do great.

Ford generally uses blends in their motors, for 2 reasons, cheaper than Synthetic, and better protection than conventional under high heat and high pressure.

Currently mine are under maintenance from my dealer, so they get the recommended oil about every 5K. If I was doing in myself, they would be running Valvoline Full Syn.

Now as far as the weight. If you are in Texas, the 5W30 is fine. If you were tuning it, towing a bunch, running it hard in high heat situations, 5W40 would probably be a good thing. 0WXX would not benefit you.

I agree with you 100%. The recommendation for brand and type (not weight) are typically based on relationships of vendors and money. So going to full synth or one with additives, etc can have benefits.
But when it comes to the actual weight, since all brands have weights of every spec, the recommended weight from the manufacturer is typically the recommended weight from the engineers. Most people assume a higher weight is better which is not the case. Engines like the Triton and BMWs typically run lighter weights by design.
IMO the rule of thumb is
- Run the weight recommended by the Manufacturer
- Run the brand & type based on what you prefer and what others recommended especially if it has a history of performance for a particular engine.
 

LokiWolf

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I read through some forums and watched this analysis review. It wasn’t an overly detailed research by me admittedly. I liked the idea of an oil designed for the eco boost but I would love to hear your thoughts if you look into it.

Thanks! I will take a look! Always looking for options.
 
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