Anyone got a CDL? Know anything about companies w/ paid CDL training programmes?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Adieu, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. Adieu

    Adieu Full Access Members

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    Been needing a job and wondering about doing one of those. Seems like they got 1-3 year commitments or some such crap?

    Anyone know who's got the least-shitty commitment terms and/or the best short severance? And some of these companies supposedly got a sweatshops-with-semis reputation?
     
  2. Habbibie

    Habbibie Is it Christmas yet? Supporting Member

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    I dont have a CDL but I know a few of my buddies do, they all insist and constantly mention that as a new driver you must do all you can to AVOID working for Swift & CR England... theres apparently a lot of hate towards them in the industry for cutting corners and improperly training new drivers
     
  3. Adieu

    Adieu Full Access Members

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    I've heard that line a few times, but a bit short on details. Their pay and conditions are apparently inferior in return for paying you to train, but what else? Is their equipment dangerously ill-maintained or what?

    Also...if not with them, then who else? To get paid to get a big-rig license with all the necessary endorsement and some behind the wheel experience, vs. going into debt to get training and then be a no-history rookie with no experience and no job at all?
     
  4. Habbibie

    Habbibie Is it Christmas yet? Supporting Member

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    https://www.thetruckersreport.com/company-warnings/

    Do your own research if you're serious about this. I personally wouldn't do this type of job, especially at this prime age heavily due to me having a young family and I'd rather be able to see them everyday vs once a week for a few hours, and if you hav ed not started a family yet then working this field you'll be forced to put any plans relating to starting a family on hold.

    The reality of it is, if you start trucking you'll likely be an on the road trucker, fixed route or not you'll be gone for a week(s) at a time, almost all of the seasoned pros want the local route that promises you home time at nights & weekends.

    Two of my friends trained with Schneider, neither of them has had any thing alarming bad to say about this company and they pay for your training as long as you fulfill your end of the deal and work for them for however long they contact you at.

    Recently a new member here joined the forum in Hopes of fixing his aunt's expedition, he is an OTR trucker and if I was you I'd try to get a hold of him & ask him anything hes willing to answer or educate me on
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
  5. Adieu

    Adieu Full Access Members

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    Actually, if it's like a year on the road for weeks at a time to get experience....that'd be just the thing for me right now.

    Don't really have anything tying me down where I am now, and don't really want to be tied down here anyway.

    Also, seems like I'll be coming into a modestly sizeable inheritance, maybe low 6 figures or so, in a few months. Spend a year frugally saving on top of that, then find a halfdecent local gig somewhere pleasant, lay down roots and drop an oversized downpayment on a house sounds like JUST the hard reset thing to get my life back on track.

    Preferably somewhere with nice cheap land, actual weather, and far faaaar away from crazy sunny friggin California
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2018
  6. jeff kushner

    jeff kushner Full Access Members

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    Frankly bud, I'd be kind of interested in seeing any place that would hire someone so bent on doing the very least but beyond that, for a young man, Truck Driving is about to become obsolete. Along with the Fast food workers, janitors and stockers at Walmart, Target fill in the ______ truck drivers will become a thing of the past, replaced by a remote-linked self-driving truck. Zero wages, zero benefits package, zero supervisors & their packages, not a single internal lawsuit, EVER! They will drive down the costs so low, no man will be able to earn a living. Shippers of ALL types will do it all online, all computer driven and no one save from the Server tenders.

    A long frickin time ago I found myself alone in my early 20's w/ a GED, yeah, not too proud of that but that's where I began. I had been a cook, hvac helper for a guy but I heard of a chance to join a trade union and go to school at night, tues & thurs. I went in Feb and took their Aptitude test, then waited. I began working in the trade before school began that Fall cause I needed a job. Some nights sucked....having to go to school after working outside in 4 degree weather on an open deck all day but the reality was, the men stepped up and the boys failed....simple as that bud, for life! I've been a Journeymen plumbing for almost 40 yrs and have competed in the market using others peoples mid-sized companies for half of that. That's really what you do as a CE. I pit my firm against you in open competition and btw, you're in a bit of trouble because I like to win!

    Point is, we all step up to different levels.....and it the harsh light of reality, it's easy for us all to see one another.

    You're a brilliant yet cranky, sardonic sob<LOL>, but you can do anything you want....

    jeff
     
  7. 1955moose

    1955moose Full Access Members

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    Jeff I've got a bus cdl in California. As you've read I drive a Ford Transit small 14 seater part time. 18 wheeler cdls are a different story. Keep in mind you've got to go for a physical, including eyes, blood pressure etc every 2 years, in my case every year. On top of that once you have a CDL, points and fines double to quadruple. So no traffic school for tickets anymore. Example a fine for having a cell phone to your ear or holding is $2750.00 plus $11,000 to company you work for. I'd think twice at your age, the written and driving tests are tough, especially Hazmat.

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  8. Dorzak

    Dorzak Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Add Mike Lowry Trucking to companies to avoid. They mostly do agriculture work within California. Always training new drivers in the spring. As long as you stay within the state borders the Federal DOT rest rules don’t apply. I was run off the road by one of their tomato truck drivers double sliding into my lane in 2009. He was on a long list of days with no break working 12-16 hours per day. Almost missed his turn and slammed on the brakes. His trailers came into my lane and I swerved to avoid first the cab in my lane and then the trailer across my lane.
     
  9. 5150 pops

    5150 pops Full Access Members

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    You have to know what you're getting into.
    If you expect what most recruiters from these trucking companies, tell you is truth, you're going to be disappointed.

    Best chance at having a life, is going to a LTL Freight Company, like Old Dominion Freight Lines, Estes Express Lines, UPS Freight (not the parcel division, ups freight is what used to be "Overnite Trucking" from Richmond, VA) Those companies will hire you as a dockworker running a forklift, and once you've established yourself as reliable, don't damage the freight or equipment, and can meet the minimum qualifications for a CDL, they will put you with a driver trainer, and you will learn in a safe environment, while getting paid, a reasonable wage. Those OTR companies all treat you very nearly like slave labor, minus the whips. Something like $350 week for whatever "their" program takes, then when they're comfortable hiring you to run a truck solo, you'll be paid peanuts. Quit before you've met your minimum obligations to them and they're going to try and collect $12,000+ for their expenses of training you.

    The LTL companies will also assign a monetary amount to the training program, they furnish, but it is far less than those of the "over the road" companies. You could be flush a lot sooner, if you want to join another company, for whatever reason.

    True, driverless vehicles are on the horizon, absolutely no doubt about it.

    False, driverless trucks, are far from a reality as far as being so mainstream, all CDL holders will be unemployed "overnight".

    There are too many not too obvious hurdles that need to be cleared, before there's any real traction for driverless trucks.

    Here's a couple...
    Any mapping service/guidance, will currently take that truck directly to the main parking lot of any company, which is almost always located at the front of the address.

    Deliveries, are almost always in the back of most properties, and can have their own separate entrance
    At a huge company/location it could literally be miles within the property to arrive at the correct location. Yes miles, within a property address, at present, only a human, reading signage can delineate where to go. There is a large trash bag manufacturer in Grand Prairie, TX that comes to mind, as well as the Defense General Supply Center, here in Chesterfield County, VA. Not a big deal for one truck delivery, per day, but there are huge distribution networks all over this country, that receive deliveries and ship out freight/goods 24/7 with each location having hundreds to thousands of trucks in and out of their property in a 24 hour span, 7 days a week. It is a very daunting task to fully automate the movement of trucks, just inside each of these locations.

    When there are detours in place on a highway, such as I-20 in northern AZ, driving westbound, to California this passed summer, the detour had traffic in both directions sharing lanes on the EASTBOUND side of the interstate for miles, at a time, all the while the Google GPS guidance from Android Auto, kept telling us to take the next exit, to return to the westbound lanes, non-stop, to the point we finally turned it off. If the GPS we're in control of a truck in that instance, it would have simply made it attempt to drive through the area where the westbound lanes had been dug up, HOPEFULLY stopping in time, to avoid the barriers that were in place, and not killing the construction workers.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
  10. 1955moose

    1955moose Full Access Members

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    Trucking is a tuff racket even at a young age. My best friend back in the 70's bought his own Peter built conventional. He did the San Francisco to Kettleman city run. Its half way to Los Angeles, they swap trailers and return to SF. He did that and other loads, but got out of it after about 2 years, and sold his truck. The expense to keep the truck right was killing him. The loads were good money, but expense was cutting into his profit. Even in my Transit van driving, were only allowed to drive 70 hours per 8 days. Anything over that, and if pulled over, the van is towed, and the company can be fined. My company that I work for is Ford owned, so you can be sure everything is monitored. We have 2 safety guys that do nothing but safety and paper items. Like being sure everyone's cdl is current, handle any accidents, and make sure nobody is over hours in driving mode.

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