Platinum Towing Experiences

JasonH

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Why? The Max has a lower cargo and towing capacity than the Standard...

Our trailer loaded is 7300lb, 32ft. Towing with a standard Platinum, with a Blue Ox Sway Pro weight distributing hitch, and it tows effortlessly.

The longer wheelbase of the max provides improved stability. The trailer is basically a lever linked to the rear of the truck. The longer the distance between the tow vehicle axles, the less of an impact the trailer motion will have on the stability of the tow vehicle.
 

Fizzy

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The longer wheelbase of the max provides improved stability. The trailer is basically a lever linked to the rear of the truck. The longer the distance between the tow vehicle axles, the less of an impact the trailer motion will have on the stability of the tow vehicle.

Seems like it would be cheaper to try a better hitch with sway management first... we spent about $1k CAD on ours, and it's been excellent.
 

Calidad

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Keep in mind any anti sway or such technology hitch or otherwise is just a bandaid. They don’t actually address the actual instability factor the trailer has which results in sway. All the anti sway stuff does is try to limit or reduce sway when it occurs.
Ultimately the sway issue is the instability factor or factors with the trailer. It can be all these things or a combination of these things, poor weight distribution, it can be poor axle alignment, low tire pressure, wind induced pressure on the trailer —- ie speed / wind related.

Any hitch or vehicle technology that is trying to mitigate trailer sway is only simply buying you a little time before a trailer with sway tendencies overcomes those devices ability to dampen the effects.

I really wish people would spend $ on getting a trailer sorted so its sway / instability factor is reduced vs spending money on devices that try to dampen sway at the TV.
 

Fizzy

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Keep in mind any anti sway or such technology hitch or otherwise is just a bandaid. They don’t actually address the actual instability factor the trailer has which results in sway. All the anti sway stuff does is try to limit or reduce sway when it occurs.
Ultimately the sway issue is the instability factor or factors with the trailer. It can be all these things or a combination of these things, poor weight distribution, it can be poor axle alignment, low tire pressure, wind induced pressure on the trailer —- ie speed / wind related.

Any hitch or vehicle technology that is trying to mitigate trailer sway is only simply buying you a little time before a trailer with sway tendencies overcomes those devices ability to dampen the effects.

I really wish people would spend $ on getting a trailer sorted so its sway / instability factor is reduced vs spending money on devices that try to dampen sway at the TV.

As we say in England... it's the Belt and Braces approach. (I think in the US you call braces suspenders? Those fabric straps that go over your shoulders and hold your pants up).

What's better than sorting the trailer out? Sorting the trailer out and using sway prevention technology too. No amount of sorting a trailer out will protect you from sudden crosswind gusts etc.

Our trailer is almost the same weight and length as @JasonH there, but we're getting flat, steady, and predictable towing.
 

Calidad

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A truly well done trailer is a joy to tow and requires none of these dampening devices on the TV. I think its an important thing to consider when thinking about your trailer choice and how much towing you plan on doing.

For instance getting a travel trailer my self would be to increase my range comfort regarding warm place in more extreme weather locations etc. For me that means even longer highway trips than my tent trailer gets hauled. So for me a big boxy trailer with really poor towing characteristics is a huge negative. If I were only parking it a few hours from home a couple times a year then a big boxy trailer with absolutely horrible towing characteristics would probably be ok.

I really don’t think new to RV people consider that aspect they look at the biggest Ranch house on wheels they can drag per the “tow rating” and go get one.
 

JasonH

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Seems like it would be cheaper to try a better hitch with sway management first... we spent about $1k CAD on ours, and it's been excellent.

Yes. I was addressing why the lower towing rating isn't the only factor in deciding between the standard and extended length wheelbase.
 

Matthew Marlowe

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Solved 99% of our towing issues with 2020 expedition platinum by switching to better constructed trailer. New is 30ft with 4400lb tandem axles, 15" offroad tires, higher ground clearance, and better weight distribution inside. Estimated trailer weight 7500lbs. No issues under 62mph, can reach 70mph without sway on flat highway..we normally just target 55-60mph. Barely notice its there. Only issue left is transmission temperature when downshifting in tow haul mode on hot days when going down 6%+ steep mountain where must limit speed to 40-45mph and constantly turn to accommodate winding roads with cliffs or narrow single lane pass. Twice have had auxiliary cooler turn on with 235+ transmission temp. But has stayed at or under 240. Not sure if need buff up cooler...
 

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GenSuper

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I have had four different Infiniti models, concluding with a QX80. I had problems towing with the engine revving at 5,000rpm trying to go up hills and weird shifting going on. The Infiniti dealer told me that was normal so I told him I would probably have to buy an Expedition, which I promptly did. First trip towing my 21' trailer was a dream, never got over 3,000rpm and pickup was great. Mileage was a little better (8.7mpg) than the Infiniti.
 

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JasonH

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I have had four different Infiniti models, concluding with a QX80. I had problems towing with the engine revving at 5,000rpm trying to go up hills and weird shifting going on. The Infiniti dealer told me that was normal so I told him I would probably have to buy an Expedition, which I promptly did. First trip towing my 21' trailer was a dream, never got over 3,000rpm and pickup was great. Mileage was a little better (8.7mpg) than the Infiniti.

I'm not surprised. I think it's just a characteristic of medium displacement naturally aspirated ICE engines. My neighbor has a Ram with the 5.7, and his trailer is near the same size as mine (~30 ft, 7,000 lbs). He complained that his truck was revving frequently while driving between Houston and San Antonio, which is fairly flat. Unless the tow vehicle has short gears, an ICE engine is going to need to rev to make enough power. Especially up grades, accelerating, or into headwinds. High horsepower at low RPM just isn't a characteristic of naturally aspirated ICE engines.
 

GenSuper

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I didn't mention that the 8.7mpg was a result of me putting my foot in it several times passing other vehicles. Will try and drive normal next trip in September and see what it gets.
 
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