Iron triton

Discussion in '1st Gen - 1997 - 2002' started by and0r, Feb 3, 2019.

  1. and0r

    and0r Full Access Members

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    does anyone know of iron heads for these engines?
     
  2. TobyU

    TobyU Full Access Members

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    I have not but I don't search a lot of performance or upgrade parts. Why do you want iron heads?
     
  3. MrSticker

    MrSticker Full Access Members

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    Biting my tongue/finger ….
     
  4. TobyU

    TobyU Full Access Members

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    Nah....permission to speak freely.

    Bait, bait, fish fish. This is my fun and relaxation.
     
  5. 1955moose

    1955moose Full Access Members

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    2 baits, sir that makes you a master! Ha Ha. I do remember you asked this question earlier. And yes they did with the 4.6 liter. I couldn't find what year, what model. Cast iron actually does have its plusses. I just got through reading a comparison on 350 small block Chevy heads. Iron vs aluminum. After flow testing, Dyno testing, etc etc, they came up a tie. They did say that with different cooling jackets, their might be a difference, but these weren't stock heads. They both had same cc rating, used same 91 octane fuel. In some situations the extra heat from cast iron is actually favorable. Years back a friend that worked with me, took his stock 400 Cid Pontiac Firebird and pulled the heavy cast iron heads, and spent close to $1,000.00 to have them ported, and 3 angle valve job. That vehicle was an absolute beast right off idle. Stayed cool, only drawback, was I helped him reinstall heads. Man, they weighed a ton. My back hurt for 2 days after. So yeah, unless you live in hot climate, or drag race at 8 grand, run after run, cast iron works fine. Did for GM, and Ford back in the day.

    Sent from my N9131 using Tapatalk
     
  6. JExpedition07

    JExpedition07 Ultimate Member Supporting Member

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    The heads work well whether aluminum or cast. The aluminum shed some weight which is a plus. I do prefer a cast iron block, it’s well known aluminum loses more strength with heat compared to other materials. Cast also has better wear factor.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2019
  7. TobyU

    TobyU Full Access Members

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    400 Pontiac is what I have built most of. Street raced a 67 GTO back around 1990 and it was at least 900.00 every time the hood came off!

    Had lots of guys in 68 GTOs and Judges some with 455s think they could beat my 400.
    They prob thought it had a 389 since 67 but they never came close.
    I had 4x or 6x heads when I bought it which I promptly threw in the trash. Well, I probably sold them since I am a cheap bastard but I got them off right now.
    Ran some 7K3 ones but mostly Ram Air III #12 heads.
    And they can take that "068" cam the purists rave about and put that in scrap metal pile too...Oh wait, there I go again. Sell it on ebay to someone who wants to pay through the nose for an inferior so so factory part. Add stock exhaust manifolds to that pile too.

    I'm not a lunatic about it. You don't have to have aluminum heads and a Warrior intake on a Pontiac and back then heads were not common in aftermarket.
    I got into these in late 80s and if was all Chevy and Ford and some Mopar I guess. (not sure Mopar needed any better heads!!)
    Some factory parts are awesome and just not worth the expense for so little gain...Until you have maximized everything else and still pushing.
    I never got that maximized.
    4 tube headers were worth it for the price even though the gaskets became maintenance items. I got good at putting them on and with the allen head bolts..not bad.
    Aluminum intake worth it and already pretty and the color an intake should be.
    GM HEI was plenty good enough.
    Cam was a MUST. Ran a big lift split pattern Lunati and a little too high on duration but it RAN.
    Quadrajet carbs ok-good, and I can rebuild one in my sleep, but I much prefer my 4779 Holley DP 750 with mechanical secondaries. This is key. I would have a quadrajet EVERY time over a holley vacuum secondary car.
    ARP head bolts worth the money for holding heads down better.
    Stock N crank good for lots of power.
    Stock rods very strong.
    TRW forged pistons more than ever needed.

    About 36 degrees total timing on 94 octane gas and keep it below 6200 rpm.

    Traction was biggest hurdle with factory suspension.
    Slicks and air bag inside of at least right spring.
    Started out with 3.08 open rear and spun one tire a lot and I think it ran 1/4 at 13.7-14.2.
    Detroit Locker out of 70 Buick grand Sport rear with 4.11 and it was high 11-low 12s.
    I had a 300 hp NOS cheater kit that I never got around to installing.

    Fun, great looking car.
     
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  8. and0r

    and0r Full Access Members

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    secret wyoming bog iron backyard peatsmelt iron heads tho
     
  9. Machete

    Machete My Rig. 2000 EB 4x4 5.4L

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    This also has a lot to do w heat dissipation. Aluminum dissipates heat faster than iron.
     
  10. TobyU

    TobyU Full Access Members

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    That's why these and the 4.6 can tolerate a lot of overheating and not blow head gaskets.
     

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