Front Brake Pad Replacement - Gen4

SublimeHiPpOs

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This is wild that the rears west out so much faster than the fronts. Typically you would expect the opposite, wonder why these have such high rear bias.
I have a Jeep Wrangler as well as the Expy, they are also known to go through rear pads much more quickly than the fronts for some reason. Maybe they bias towards the rear on taller SUVs to help combat nose dive under heavy breaking? Or maybe in the case of the Expy it could be due to potentially extra weight on the rear while towing?
 

Peter L

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Great post! I've recenlty noticed that there seems ot be a "rumble" noise coming from the front under braking. It's not real loud and it's not s shudder like you'd get with a warped rotor. There also isn't any shimmy at all in the steering and no squeaking or squealing, just sortt of a low hum.... 2019 Expedition Limited with about 30,000 on the odometer. Any thoughts?
 

Peter L

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Great post adn timely as I may need to do something with my front brakes. Mine seem to have a low rumble or hum when braking. It' snot a shudder adn there' no shimmy like you'd exepct with a warped rotor...it's just a sort of rumble for lack of a better word. There is no squeaking or squealing and there doesn't seem to eb any loss of baraking power, nor does there seem to be any noise form the rear. I have a 2019 Limited 4x4 and I just passed 30,000 miles. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

Peter L

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Sorry about the double post - it looked like the original didn't take - My bad........
 

Leadfoot17

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Thanks for another great writeup. You've confirmed my suspicion on the front brakes...I can hear my back one squealing at 36k but front seems fine, so i'll probably just replace the rears and keep on truckin
If you hear any level of squeal from the rears, you're likely metal on metal already. I have a 2018--mine started squealing at 40K miles and I figured it was the wear indicator...welp, there is no wear indicator so...needed a new rotor...hope not same for you.

#goodluck
 

2020ExpyPlatinum

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Front brakes do 70% of the braking and rears usually only do about 30%.

The rear pads end up getting stuck in their holders since they don't get used as much. This is common with a lot of manufacturers. Honda rear brakes sometimes were gone after 20,000 miles.

The best way to prevent the rears from wearing out prematurely is to clean and lubricate the slide pins and clean the areas where the brake pads slide on the brackets.

Good write up by the OP!
 

duneslider

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I don't know what pad composition the ford is using stock (haven't looked) but in the example of the jeep wrangler above, the jeep used a semi-metallic pad in front and an organic in back. The organic pads wear really fast. I don't know the reason they spec it that way but since I stopped using the organic pads on my jeep the front and rear wear out at a pretty similar rate.

I wonder if ford is doing this also. I have also heard that the traction control is the cause for more rear wear, most of the traction control is performed by applying rear brake.
 

TX-EXPMAX

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I experienced the same thing in my wife’s Land Rover LR4. Never made sense to me but rears always went faster than fronts.
 

rd618

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I’m interested if the semi make an improvement in stopping distance.
 
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Overtow

Overtow

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The truck seems to stop better, but thats all subjective, I have no data to back up that statement.

A low rumble would seem to me to be a wheel bearing, which I feel like a number of people have had replaced early on in life. The way I diagnose this is to find two freeway exits/onramps, one that banks left and the other banking right. If the noise diminishes while turning left (putting pressure on right side of vehicle), its likely a bearing on the left side. Opposite if quiet while turning to the right.
 
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