Platinum Towing Experiences

Fizzy

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I have a 2020 Platinum, with the HD Tow pack. The maximum towing capacity is rated as 9200lbs.

We're looking at buying a travel trailer, and the ones I've had my eye on top out at between 7500 and 8500lbs GVWR. Of course, that's the maximum the trailer axles are rated to carry with our cargo on board (beer, food, clothes, beer, water, beer etc) - so likely less than that in the real world.

Ordinarily I wouldn't think twice about this because it's under the max rating, but we live in the foothills of the Rockies, and will be dragging this thing all over the mountains camping.

Is this too close to the line with the terrain considerations? Is that 9200lbs an "engineering safety" number? (lots of things have a rated limit far below their real limit, for a safety margin)

Thoughts on this? Am I worrying over nothing? Anyone else have relevant tow experiences to share?

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bwhinnen

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I'm doing the same process at the moment. The biggest factor is the payload of your specific truck (mine is 1557lbs, which when you add driver, passengers, cargo, will not necessarily leave much for the hitch/tongue weight). You will generally not be able to hit the max towing capacity of the truck without exceeding payload :(

This thread (https://www.expeditionforum.com/threads/can-we-talk-hd-tow-one-more-time.44864/) has some great ideas of all the different payloads seen in the gen 4's.

What you need to look at is hitch (tongue) weight first and what you are going to carry in the truck, then front and rear axle weights, then overall GCVWR (which should be around 15500lbs). The other thing is overall length of the travel trailer.

I'm trying to stay under approximately 7600 - 8000lbs GVWR for the travel trailer personally, as that will come close to maxing out what available payload I have left (and remember the class IV hitch is only supposed to carry 930lbs according to the documentation).

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Second edit: From what I've read, and seen with the TFL test on the 2018 with HD Tow pulling 7,000lbs up the Ike was done quite well, so I think at the 8000lbs, you'd be ok even going up the mountains at a safe speed :)
 
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Shaffer9

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@Fizzy off topic(sorry) but what roof box you running in your profile photo? Can rear hatch open fully?
 

Fizzy

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@Fizzy off topic(sorry) but what roof box you running in your profile photo? Can rear hatch open fully?

Yakima Skybox 21 Carbonite. Yes, hatch opens fully with about 1/4" clearance!

Also, this box is the only one that allows you to use the roof crossbars at their furthest apart setting. If you get a Thule, you have to move the rear crossbar to the other position (about 10 inches closer to the front crossbar). I was worried about this being less stable, and wanted them as far apart as possible.

The Skybox comes in smaller capacities, but I can't remember what the max crossbar spread was on those.

Also, made in the USA :)

Photo with the hatch open:
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Waterbeach

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The limiting factor will be payload, not the 9200lb it can pull. My Platinum max has max payload of 1644 lbs. Deduct hitch weight of trailer you are looking at (or just calculate about 12% of likely loaded trailer weight) from payload, less people, roof box, gear, beer, fuel, etc.. then compare that to the payload sticker on your vehicle. That will tell you how likely you are to be over or under axle weight limits. If OK, then use a good WD hitch with decent sway control as at 7500 lbs you don't want the trailer overpowering the tow vehicle in an emergency swerve / stop. Once loaded, check at a CAT scale.
 

KFordEx8

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The general rule in the RV world is to keep at least a 20% buffer so that would be 7,360lbs max in your case. Also, generally, the max manufacturer rating is what they guarantee you can tow without something breaking or going wrong. It doesn't guarantee that you can go 55mph up a 9% grade.

Keep in mind the amount of cargo and passenger weight in the vehicle, too.

I'm looking to replace a 2005 Expedition rated at 8,600 lb max with a new one. I have been towing a small ultra lite travel trailer. It's good on flats but when it sees a slight grade, I find that it lacks power to keep up.
 

Jimmer

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I'd second what Waterbeach is saying. Power shouldn't be an issue even at altitude due to the turbos and 10 speed, payload will be the limiting factor for what you can safely and comfortably tow. Don't forget to calculate in the weight of the wdh/sway control when you're figuring payload, unless you've already added it into the trailers tongue weight obviously.

Off topic but what wheels do you have on there? Those look really sharp with the white. Been looking for a set of wheels to put my winter tires on and i think those would look good with the magnetic grey on my truck as well.
 

MHay

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I tow a 7500 lb. (actual weight) 35’ travel trailer with my 2020 Platinum Max. I agree with @Waterbeach in that you’ll hit the payload and/or GAWR limit before you hit the trailer limit. Power isn’t a problem at all. The issue I’ve had was with the softness of the rear suspension. After last year’s camping season I invested in a Hellwig rear sway bar and Sumo spring helpers. Hoping I’ll feel a difference when we take our first trip this year in a few weeks.
 

mwl001

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How many people are going to be in that Expedition when you tow? Much in the same way people say you can have Eco or Boost, but not both, you can either fill up your Expedition with people and stuff, or tow a heavy trailer... but not both. However the fact that you can get/do EITHER is what makes this a great vehicle IMO.

If you're needing that Skybox because your Expedition will be full of people and cargo... there's almost no way you'll be able to stay under max payload. Even a Max would have an issue and probably come up short. Something that heavy is also probably really long and will cause sway issues in certain conditions or all the time.
 

shane_th_ee

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First, good for you for looking at GVWR instead of brochure weight. Second, I think you'll hit the receiver rating before payload. Travel trailers, due to their boxy shape, need a relatively high tongue weight (compared to, say, a flat bed or even a boat). Typically, travel trailers will sway unless the tongue weight is at least 12% of the trailer weight. Unless Ford has changed the design since 2018, your receiver is only rated to 930lbs. And 930 is 12% of 7750. Personally, I'd be a little more conservative as some trailers need more than 12% to be stable and other trailers have layouts which result in relatively high tongue weights*.

*For instance, our trailer has the fresh water tank at the front of the box.
 
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