Would love some folks thoughts on this, regarding oil changes on this engine.

Disclaimer: Links on this page pointing to Amazon, eBay and other sites may include affiliate code. If you click them and make a purchase, we may earn a small commission.

5280tunage

Full Access Members
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Posts
1,516
Reaction score
887
Location
colorado
First, the video. I know this guy and his shop are highly regarded in the Ford automotive world, but something just feels off here.

https://youtu.be/eHPSgqipk-E

For the last three vehicles including this one, I've been very, very stringent on maintaining my oil change intervals, based on the ECU intelligent oil change platforms. I've never had issues in the past, and I've always used premium oils and oil filters, so I'm a little bit hesitant to think that it has to be 5,000 or fewer miles. These systems are supposed to be intelligent enough to take into account driving behaviors, wear and tear, and stress on the engine and components.

But I really am interested also in part of what this guy says, around the oil pickup filters for the turbos. Has anyone in this forum gone through the process of replacing those filters on their own? To me, this seems like something that realistically needs to be part of regular maintenance, maybe every 50,000 miles or so? Obviously this video doesn't go into how difficult it is to change those filters while the turbos are still installed in the vehicle, but I'd be curious. Seems to me like a pretty cheap fix if you can get to these and actually get them out without breaking something else. I'm fairly mechanically inclined, so I'm pretty sure I could do it, I'm just not really sure how easy these are to get to. Haven't even looked to be honest. Is this the kind of thing that during an oil change you could easily pop off both of these pick up units, pull the pipe a little bit out of the way and replace the filters?

If that's the case, I'm more than happy to buy a couple of sets of these just to have them around. I will say that every time I've changed the oil in this vehicle, I've never actually captured nearly as much as I expected, but I've also never had any major sludge issues either.
 

JasonH

Full Access Members
Joined
Nov 12, 2018
Posts
1,342
Reaction score
716
Location
Houston, TX
You can't get to them easily, as the engine bay is tight. You have to go through the wheel wells and it's a pita. The 5k m oci is intended to be preventive maintenance to ensure the filters never get clogged. Call it inexpensive insurance, especially if you're willing to do the changes yourself. Anecdotally, my gen 1 is at 148k and the timing chain rattles, but no turbo issues. I did the olm interval with full synthetic, but have no clue what the first 60k maintenance was like. Do the 5k oci and budget for a repair or replacement.
 

rd618

Full Access Members
Joined
Nov 1, 2021
Posts
683
Reaction score
324
Location
new york
First, the video. I know this guy and his shop are highly regarded in the Ford automotive world, but something just feels off here.

https://youtu.be/eHPSgqipk-E

For the last three vehicles including this one, I've been very, very stringent on maintaining my oil change intervals, based on the ECU intelligent oil change platforms. I've never had issues in the past, and I've always used premium oils and oil filters, so I'm a little bit hesitant to think that it has to be 5,000 or fewer miles. These systems are supposed to be intelligent enough to take into account driving behaviors, wear and tear, and stress on the engine and components.

But I really am interested also in part of what this guy says, around the oil pickup filters for the turbos. Has anyone in this forum gone through the process of replacing those filters on their own? To me, this seems like something that realistically needs to be part of regular maintenance, maybe every 50,000 miles or so? Obviously this video doesn't go into how difficult it is to change those filters while the turbos are still installed in the vehicle, but I'd be curious. Seems to me like a pretty cheap fix if you can get to these and actually get them out without breaking something else. I'm fairly mechanically inclined, so I'm pretty sure I could do it, I'm just not really sure how easy these are to get to. Haven't even looked to be honest. Is this the kind of thing that during an oil change you could easily pop off both of these pick up units, pull the pipe a little bit out of the way and replace the filters?

If that's the case, I'm more than happy to buy a couple of sets of these just to have them around. I will say that every time I've changed the oil in this vehicle, I've never actually captured nearly as much as I expected, but I've also never had any major sludge issues either.

You never really know what someone says they did vs what they were actually doing, or what oil they used. Like everything else on the internet you have to take some of this with a grain of salt. Is there some reality to it, probably, but could some of this been exaggerated a bit, most likely.

I also looked up those filters and how to change them, they are pretty coarse and not prone to much failure, especially like how he shows them collapsed. I do agree though if you're having turbo work done anyway, and all the parts are already taken apart, yes, throw on new filters and seals too.
My 2 cents, use the oil change monitor the same as your gas tank gauge, when it gets down to 1/3 start looking to get it done sooner than later. Waiting until the indicator says 0% or you run out of gas is just a recipe for disaster.
 
OP
OP
5280tunage

5280tunage

Full Access Members
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Posts
1,516
Reaction score
887
Location
colorado
What strikes me a little bit here, is that if those pickups are prone to clogging over time, why wouldn't there be a flow monitor on them? i.e. given that those pickups in the video collapsed, logically from vacuum, one would think you could have a pressure switch that would do the same thing as the filter if too much vacuum builds, thereby notifying with a CEL for example. seems like something that simple could prevent thousands in damage.
 

LazSlate

Full Access Members
Joined
May 7, 2022
Posts
378
Reaction score
216
Location
Arizona
I agree with 5k and also look at the oil. If its still caramel color and clean chances of the turbo filter getting clogged is minimal to none. Willing to bet that oil from the you tube video was really dirty.
 

rd618

Full Access Members
Joined
Nov 1, 2021
Posts
683
Reaction score
324
Location
new york
What strikes me a little bit here, is that if those pickups are prone to clogging over time, why wouldn't there be a flow monitor on them? i.e. given that those pickups in the video collapsed, logically from vacuum, one would think you could have a pressure switch that would do the same thing as the filter if too much vacuum builds, thereby notifying with a CEL for example. seems like something that simple could prevent thousands in damage.
Good point. Or remove the screen all together. Not like it’s preventing wear particles from getting through.
 

GixxerJasen

Full Access Members
Joined
Aug 8, 2022
Posts
311
Reaction score
261
Location
DFW TX
Are those filters on all the ecoboost engines? Seems like if it were a high failure item we'd have heard about it by now on some of the higher mileage engines.
 
OP
OP
5280tunage

5280tunage

Full Access Members
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Posts
1,516
Reaction score
887
Location
colorado
I'd have to imagine so, if not, then I'd actually be a bit more annoyed, in the sense that if you were experiencing issues with older Eco's, enough that engineers thought it would be important enough to put filters in the system, but not make them easily replaceable or something the ECU could monitor, seems like a half-ass fix.
 

LazSlate

Full Access Members
Joined
May 7, 2022
Posts
378
Reaction score
216
Location
Arizona
Good point. Or remove the screen all together. Not like it’s preventing wear particles from getting through.

That filter is important. The turbo bearings float on a coating of oil sort of suspended. Small particles may wear in the long run but large ones will destroy the bearings in no time.
 
Top